allison-grunwald:

More mystery marks, a lot of them on a single tibia.

(One looks like a sharp tooth puncture.)

Pianist Facing The Riot Police: Demonstration in Kiev, Ukraine.

Pianist Facing The Riot Police: Demonstration in Kiev, Ukraine.

(Source: twitter.com)

Tags: Kiev Ukraine

mucholderthen:

Rosalind Franklin’s 1952 X-ray diffraction image of DNA, known as photo 51, led to James Watson and Francis Crick’s famous model of the double helix. 

The photograph provided key information that was essential for developing a model of DNA.The diffraction pattern determined the helical nature of the double helix strands (antiparallel). The outside linings of DNA have a phosphate backbone, and codes for inheritance are inside the helix. Watson and Crick’s calculations from Franklin’s photography gave crucial parameters for the size and structure of the helix.

James Watson was shown the photo by Maurice Wilkins without Rosalind Franklin’s approval or knowledge and along with Francis Crick, Watson used characteristics and features of Photo 51 to develop the chemical model of DNA molecule. 

SOURCES: Nature News & Comment and Wikipedia.

TOP IMAGE source  |||  LOWER IMAGE source

(via anthropologyadventures)

thechirurgeonsapprentice:

Tertiary syphilitic ulceration of the scalp (19th century). 

thechirurgeonsapprentice:

Tertiary syphilitic ulceration of the scalp (19th century). 

No Money and In Pain, Chinese Man Saws Off Own Leg at Home

A metal saw, a small fruit knife, and a back-scratcher wrapped with a towel. 47-year-old Zheng Yanliang used these three simple tools and sawed off his entire right leg, which was suffering some strange ailment, at home on his bed. He bit off four molars enduring the pain. Today, the same strange ailment spreads pitilessly on his left leg. Zheng Yanliang hopes that kind-hearted people can give help, cure the strange disease that torments him, and provide him with a prosthetic limb so that he can once again support his wife and daughter.

Read the whole story here

See also Huffington Post for more pics

An 18th century hand-illustrated page from an Ottoman Turk dental book showing a molar infected with toothworms. As early as Babylonian times and lasting well into the eighteenth century, it was thought that a toothache was caused by worms. (The theory was disproved by Jacob Christian Schaffer in 1757.) These worms were depicted in art as dwelling with the demons of Hell and feeding upon the sinners. In a cavity on one side of the bisected tooth, Lucifer watches as two worms devour and entrap their victims. In the other half of the tooth, demons lord over a collection of human skulls. 

Via Moshita

An 18th century hand-illustrated page from an Ottoman Turk dental book showing a molar infected with toothworms. As early as Babylonian times and lasting well into the eighteenth century, it was thought that a toothache was caused by worms. (The theory was disproved by Jacob Christian Schaffer in 1757.) These worms were depicted in art as dwelling with the demons of Hell and feeding upon the sinners. In a cavity on one side of the bisected tooth, Lucifer watches as two worms devour and entrap their victims. In the other half of the tooth, demons lord over a collection of human skulls.

Via Moshita

Fracture of a single bone trabeculum in osteoporosis (16x). 

By Michael J. Klein, M.D., Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

Source: www.microscopyu.com

Fracture of a single bone trabeculum in osteoporosis (16x).

By Michael J. Klein, M.D., Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

Source: www.microscopyu.com

An anthropologist proposed a game to the kids in an African tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the kids that who ever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run they all took each others hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats. When he asked them why they had run like that as one could have had all the fruits for himself they said: ”UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the other ones are sad?” ‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: “I am because we are”

Source: eldargis.tumblr.com

An anthropologist proposed a game to the kids in an African tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the kids that who ever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run they all took each others hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats. When he asked them why they had run like that as one could have had all the fruits for himself they said: ”UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the other ones are sad?” ‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: “I am because we are”

Source: eldargis.tumblr.com

Skeletal Creatures Carved From Everyday Objects

What once were doors, rolling pins, coat hangers, and picture frames are now the skeletal remains of vertebrates. Montreal-based artist Maskull Lasserre brings these objects to life- or perhaps death. By carefully carving into the wooden surfaces that we commonly overlook in our everyday environments, Lasserre reveals a deeper world inside. For the month of December until January 19, 2013, his woodworkings were exhibited as a set called Fable in Toronto’s Centre Space gallery. Click on the link to read his philosophical artist statement for Fable and stay tuned after the jump to watch his interview.

According to Lasserre:

The history of these well worn things holds the potential for surprising outcomes. The jeopardy, animation, delicacy and decay, that has slept in the wood through all its prior use and purpose is revealed through my work. My hope is not to illustrate the details of incidental carved motifs, but to reveal the mystery, and the potential for risk and wonder that waits in the untouched wood.”

See more work by Maskull Lasserre in the portfolio on his website.

The diagnosis and context of a facial deformity from an Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spofforth, North Yorkshire

Elizabeth Craig-Atkins (School of Applied SciencesBournemouth University) and Geoff Craig (University of Sheffield)

International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (2012)

Abstract
An individual aged between 6 and 7 years at death from a 7th to 9th century cemetery at Village Farm, Spofforth, North Yorkshire, presented significant pathological swelling to the left facial bones. The ectocranial surface was bulbous and uneven, and the expanded diploë was densely packed with a mass of thick trabeculae. Radiographic and histological analysis, in combination with the macroscopically observed pathological changes, supported the differential diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. The skeletal changes to the left face and jaw would have resulted in a significant facial deformity. Examples of individuals with physical impairments or disfigurements from Anglo-Saxon cemeteries are rare.

Nevertheless, it seems that a significant proportion are afforded unusual burial practices more often associated with deviancy, for example, at the edge of cemeteries or on a reversed orientation, seemingly indicating that their diminished physical capabilities or altered physical appearance had a detrimental effect on their social status. The child from Spofforth was, however, buried in a normative manner, extended, supine and in a plain earth-cut grave, with no indication that their facial deformity had prompted unusual funerary provision. This example of facial disfigurement contributes to a growing corpus of potentially disabled individuals from early medieval England.

Click here to read this article from the International Journal of Osteoarchaeology

The diagnosis and context of a facial deformity from an Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spofforth, North Yorkshire

Elizabeth Craig-Atkins (School of Applied SciencesBournemouth University) and Geoff Craig (University of Sheffield)

International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (2012)

Abstract
An individual aged between 6 and 7 years at death from a 7th to 9th century cemetery at Village Farm, Spofforth, North Yorkshire, presented significant pathological swelling to the left facial bones. The ectocranial surface was bulbous and uneven, and the expanded diploë was densely packed with a mass of thick trabeculae. Radiographic and histological analysis, in combination with the macroscopically observed pathological changes, supported the differential diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. The skeletal changes to the left face and jaw would have resulted in a significant facial deformity. Examples of individuals with physical impairments or disfigurements from Anglo-Saxon cemeteries are rare.

Nevertheless, it seems that a significant proportion are afforded unusual burial practices more often associated with deviancy, for example, at the edge of cemeteries or on a reversed orientation, seemingly indicating that their diminished physical capabilities or altered physical appearance had a detrimental effect on their social status. The child from Spofforth was, however, buried in a normative manner, extended, supine and in a plain earth-cut grave, with no indication that their facial deformity had prompted unusual funerary provision. This example of facial disfigurement contributes to a growing corpus of potentially disabled individuals from early medieval England.

Click here to read this article from the International Journal of Osteoarchaeology

Advertisement for Atabrine, anti-malaria drug, in Papua, New Guinea during WWII.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mepacrine

Advertisement for Atabrine, anti-malaria drug, in Papua, New Guinea during WWII.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mepacrine

Four methods of trepanation demonstrated on a single human skull

Dr. Thomas Wilson Parry (1866-1945) owned this particular skull, which he used to perform practical research on trepanation. He performed roughly 50 trepanation experiments on the skulls of the more and less recent deceased, using in this case a shark’s tooth, a flint-pointed bow drill, a flint scraper, and obsidian to achieve the variety of holes. Parry published Trephination of the Living Human Skull in Prehistoric Times in 1923, and an amusing ballad about the practice in 1918.

Read more here.

Four methods of trepanation demonstrated on a single human skull

Dr. Thomas Wilson Parry (1866-1945) owned this particular skull, which he used to perform practical research on trepanation. He performed roughly 50 trepanation experiments on the skulls of the more and less recent deceased, using in this case a shark’s tooth, a flint-pointed bow drill, a flint scraper, and obsidian to achieve the variety of holes. Parry published Trephination of the Living Human Skull in Prehistoric Times in 1923, and an amusing ballad about the practice in 1918.

Read more here.

Computed tomography in paleoanthropology — an overview

by Heike Scherf

"Computed tomography (CT) was first applied in the early 1970s and introduced subsequently a new perspective towards anatomical imaging. In the last decade, high-resolution CT (HR-CT) had a high impact on anthropology and paleoanthropology through its ability to define and explore subtle differences in hard tissue structures in fossil and extant humans and nonhuman primates. CT is very suitable for unique fossil material, because it is destruction free and the original material stays intact while the internal structures are digitized. The imaging yields a virtual copy of the object, which can be used for the generation of detailed copies of original fossil material. CT data allow multiple studies in parallel and independently on specimens which are not commonly accessible. Diverse CT systems with different performance characteristics as designed for different functions can make it difficult for a researcher to choose the most appropriate CT system and to check the image quality of CT scans. The physical principles involved in CT imaging and the principles of signal processing and computer graphics can help to choose the best scan setting and the most suitable CT system for a study. Quantitative and qualitative analysis can also be improved and comparisons between different studies can be facilitated when the above mentioned principles are taken into account. In the following, I will give an overview of the different CT systems and discus both theoretical and practical matters of CT imaging using the example of trabecular bone" (read more/not open access).

Source: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences 2013, doi: 10.1007/s12520-013-0128-5; top image: Max Planck Institute

Via theolduvaigorge

Drink Coffee! Do Stupid Things Faster with More Energy.

Drink Coffee! Do Stupid Things Faster with More Energy.

Tags: Coffee

Alice Dixon Le Plongeon (1851 – 1910) was an English photographer, amateur archaeologist traveller, and author. Together with her husband Augustus Le Plongeon (1825 – 1908) she spent eleven years living and working in southern Mexico and Central America photographing and studying the ruined cities of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. Together with her husband, she helped make some of the first photographs of ruins at Chichén Itzá and Uxmal.

Alice and Augustus camped in the center room of the Governor’s Palace at Uxmal during their field work there in 1876. Note their surveying and photographic equipment, Alice’s Remington Rolling Block rifle, hammock, and their dog Trinity sleeping in the corner. Not in the photo is their portable darkroom where they developed their photos. Photo by Alice and Augustus, 1876

Source: Exavation Of The Platform Of Venus, Chichén Itzá, Yucatán, México: The Pioneering Field Work ff Alice Dixon Le Plongeon and Augustus Le Plongeon.

Alice Dixon Le Plongeon (1851 – 1910) was an English photographer, amateur archaeologist traveller, and author. Together with her husband Augustus Le Plongeon (1825 – 1908) she spent eleven years living and working in southern Mexico and Central America photographing and studying the ruined cities of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. Together with her husband, she helped make some of the first photographs of ruins at Chichén Itzá and Uxmal.

Alice and Augustus camped in the center room of the Governor’s Palace at Uxmal during their field work there in 1876. Note their surveying and photographic equipment, Alice’s Remington Rolling Block rifle, hammock, and their dog Trinity sleeping in the corner. Not in the photo is their portable darkroom where they developed their photos. Photo by Alice and Augustus, 1876

Source: Exavation Of The Platform Of Venus, Chichén Itzá, Yucatán, México: The Pioneering Field Work ff Alice Dixon Le Plongeon and Augustus Le Plongeon.